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Course Descriptions

Sociology

SOC 100 Introduction to Sociology (4) (S)

An introduction to sociology as a behavioral science and way of viewing the world. Students learn basic concepts of sociological investigation and interpretation and critical thinking. They see how individual behavior is shaped by group life and how group life is affected by individuals. They learn to apply a "sociological imagination" to examining social issues. Common sense notions are replaced by a critical analysis of social issues. Offered each semester.

SOC 110 Cultural Anthropology (4) (S)

Study of the nature of culture; comparative analysis of social, religious, economic, and political institutions in specific preliterate and modern cultures; the cultural dimensions of behavior. Offered each fall.

SOC 219 Women in Culture and Society (4) (S)

Students examine conflicting definitions of gender in the contemporary U.S., analyzing general patterns and the impact of gender definitions on their own lives. Differences in the definitions of womanhood and manhood are discussed, along with the variety of women's experiences and perspectives. Ideas about gender are contrasted with the real-life situations of women and men in our society. Emphasizes the opportunities and difficulties that women of differing races and classes encounter in today's society. Identical to WGS 219. Offered each fall.

SOC 227 Social Psychology (4)

Explores our development as socialized human beings is shaped through our interactions with groups of other people and how the structure and function of both the formal and informal groups that exist in a society are shaped by the personalities of the individuals who comprise their membership. Students discover both academically and experientially the nature of such group-related psychological dynamics as attitude formation, interpersonal attraction, social conflict, and bureaucratic organization. Prerequisite: PSY 102, 201, or SOC 100. Identical to PSY 227. Offered each fall.

SOC 251 Issues in Sociology (4) (S)

Examines various topics and issues through the lens and methodology of the sociological perspective. Topics may include animals and society, the sociology of food, aging, gender and sexuality, and adoption and foster care. May be repeated for credit as designated issues change. Offered intermittenly.

SOC 270 Social Problems and Social Solutions (4) (S)

A critical investigation of selected current social problems--their issues, causes, development, and alternative solutions. Offered each spring.

SOC 303 Small Groups (4)

An experiential course in which sociological theories and methods are used to analyze the structure and processes of small social groups. Prerequisite: junior/senior status. Offered each fall.

SOC 308 Visual Sociology (4) (W)

A survey of basic concepts in sociology as they are portrayed in selected motion pictures and music videos. Serves as a systematic application of sociological theory and practice. Prerequisite: ENG 105 with a grade of C or higher; any sociology course would be helpful but not required. Offered each semester.

SOC 311 Family (4) (S,W)

Examines the contemporary American family and the history, forms, and functions of families in other times and other cultures is also examined. Special attention is given to the family as a social institution, its relationship with other institutions, forces of social and cultural change, and the future of the family. Prerequisite: ENG 105 with a grade of C or higher. Offered each fall.

SOC 319 Feminist and Gender Theory (4) (W)

Examines contemporary arguments about the nature of women and men and the biological, social, and aesthetic categories of male, female, intersex, masculine, feminine, heterosexual, homosexual, and transgendered. Gender issues are studied in relation to historical and cross-cultural contexts, in relation to Western women's movements of the 19th and 20th centuries, and in relation to local and global issues affected by the politics of gender. Prerequisites: ENG 105 with a grade of C or higher; WGS/SOC 219, WGS 220, or ENG 311 (formerly ENG/TH 311); or consent. Identical to ENG 319 and WGS 319. Offered spring of odd-numbered years.

SOC 336 Sociology of Religion (4) (V)

Examines the origin and development of religion as a social institution: theories concerning its nature and function; sociocultural dimensions of religious beliefs, values, and conduct; contemporary denominations, sects, and cults in the United States; the relationship between religion and other social institutions. Identical to RELST 336. Offered intermittently.

SOC 345 Foundations of Sociology (4)

An examination of major theorists, and perspectives contributing to the sociological tradition; historic and current issues regarding sociology and its relationship to other academic disciplines. A foundation course required of all majors. Prerequisite: SOC 100 or 188. Offered each spring.

SOC 350 Introduction to Social Research (4)

An examination of the logic, the strategies and the methods of sociological inquiry; an analysis of classical and contemporary models of research. A foundation course required for sociology majors. Identical to CJ 350. Prerequisite: junior/senior status. Offered each semester.

SOC 351 Medical Sociology (4) (S)

Designed to provide students an introduction to sociological perspectives on the study of health, illness, and health care. Topics include epidemiology, the structures and organization of health care systems and medical encounters, bioethical issues, and current issues shaping the future of health, illness, and health care. Offered intermittently.

SOC 353 Applied Sociology (4)

Focus is on engaging the sociological imagination and the sociological toolkit to address real-life questions and problems. These tools are used to identify, examine, and seek solutions for various social issues. Attention is given to careers in applied sociology. Includes a service-learning component. Prerequisite: junior/senior status or consent. Offered each spring.

SOC 400 Topics in Criminal Justice and Sociology (4)

An advanced seminar addressing announced topics in criminal justice and sociology. Topics may include victimology, administration of justice, criminalistics, sociology of terrorism, community systems, war, peace and conflict, sociology of environment, consumerism, child welfare, and more. May be repeated for credit as designated topics change. Prerequisite: consent. Identical to CJ 400. Offered as topics become available.

SOC 430 Women's/Gender Studies Seminar (4) (I)

An examination of current issues pertinent to women and gender. Students will be exposed to a variety of feminist, gender, and cultural theories. Topics vary from semester to semester. Recent topics include "Violence, Non-Violence, and the Body," "Gender Trouble," and the "The Female Athlete." Prerequisites: WGS 219 or WGS 319 and junior or senior status or consent. Identical to WGS 430. May be repeated for credit as topics change. Offered spring of odd-numbered years.

SOC 460 Readings in Sociology (2-4)

Students select a topic concerning sociological theory or research, survey the relevant literature, and discuss their findings with their major professor. (Two or four semester hours depending on the scope of the project.) May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: prior consent of the project advisor. Offered each semester.

SOC 480 Senior Research Project (4) (W)

Students conduct a sociological research project of their own design, present the results in appropriate written form, and defend the effort in an oral examination. Research problems may focus on theoretical or empirical topics. Relevant methods may range from bibliographic search to field observation. Prerequisites: ENG 105 with a grade of C or higher, SOC 350, junior/senior status, and prior approval of a written proposal. Committee defense optional. Offered each spring.

SOC 483 Internship Preparation (2)

Designed for students intending to participate in an internship for sociology or criminal justice credit. The process of selecting an internship site, completing applications and forms, and understanding the requirements set forth by the Department of Sociology and Criminal Justice can be overwhelming. Lectures and scenario training provide students with practical information that should be beneficial to students who desire an internship in sociology or criminal justice. Prerequisite: consent of internship director. Offered each fall.

SOC 484 Internship in Criminal Justice and Sociology (8)

Practiced, supervised experience in direct student learning in applied social settings. Students learn how acquired knowledge and research writing skills can be applied to the workplace. Practical and applied learning through student performance in the applied setting gives the student a "competitive edge" for future community/workplace contribution. Prerequisites: 18 hours of sociology or criminal justice, and CJ 483 or SOC 483. Students must contact the department faculty to review full eligibility for this course. Identical to CJ 484. Offered each spring.

SOC 485 Seminar (1-3)

Advanced seminars on various announced topics and issues such as: social conflict, sport and leisure, popular culture, etc. The credit hour value of the course (1 or 3) will be pre-determined by the department and professor of record depending upon the topic being offered, and all students enrolled in each section of the course will earn the same credit hour(s). May be repeated for credit as designated topics change. Prerequisite: any 200-level sociology or criminal justice course or consent. Offered intermittenly.

SOC 489 Senior Integrated Assessment (4) (I)

Students assess and analyze the connectedness of their academic learning in light of their future goals. Contemporary topics take a holistic and systematic perspective focusing on a variety of issues such as justice, ethics, and community needs. Prerequisite: junior/senior status. Juniors need consent from the instructor. Identical to CJ 489. Offered each fall.

Criminal Justice

CJ 205 Issues in Criminal Justice (4)

Engages students in critical analysis of the criminal justice system in America. Emphasizes the investigation of social order and the notion of "justice" as defined by the various social institutions. Students explore the significance of law, state and property relations, and the administration of justice through police, the courts, and corrections is also examined. Offered each semester.

CJ 210 Corrections (4)

Provides an appreciation of the processes and structures of corrections within an American and international framework. Specifically, we examine historical, legal, economic and sociological issues in maintaining control and order over those defined as criminal. The course provides a critical examination of the concepts of punishment, deterrence, and rehabilitation. Prerequisite: CJ 205. Offered each fall.

CJ 250 Topics in Criminal Justice (4)

A seminar addressing of various announced topics that may include public policy in criminal justice, controversial/debated laws in the U.S., taboo practices, understanding violence, murder, property crime, corruption, ethics, and more. May be repeated for credit as designated topics change. Prerequisites: sophomore status or consent. Offered in selected Winter Sessions.

CJ 300 Law Enforcement (4)

A critical ex;oration of law enforcement from an historical, sociological, and legal perspective. Race, social class, sexual orientation, and gender identities are considered in the context of occupational roles and community issues. Attention is given to viable problem-solving strategies for issues in law enforcement. Prerequisite: CJ 205 or 301. Offered fall of odd-numbered years.

CJ 301 Criminology (4)

A sociological view of crime and criminality. Socioeconomic, cultural, and biosocial processes are considered, as well as the criminal products of society. Topics include theories about the causation of crime, crime typologies, and patterns of crime and social injury. Prerequisite: CJ 205. Offered each spring.

CJ 340 Forensic Accounting (4)

The application of accounting methods to assist in solving economic-based crimes. The course includes discussion of criminal statues relating to financial crimes, fraud investigation and prevention, techniques used in solving financial crimes, and current issues in financial investigation. Identical to MBE 340. Prerequisite: MBE 203. Offered spring of even-numbered years.

CJ 348 Delinquency and Juvenile Justice (4) (S)

An examination of the nature and scope of delinquency and of factors contributing to delinquent behavior. The role of social agents and agencies in prevention and treatment is also examined. Offered fall of odd-numbered years.

CJ 350 Introduction to Social Research (4)

An examination of the logic, the strategies and the methods of sociological inquiry; an analysis of classical and contemporary models of research. A foundation course required for sociology majors. Identical to SOC 350. Prerequisite: junior/senior status. Offered each semester.

CJ 360 Courts in the American Criminal Justice System (4)

Examines the role of the American criminal courts in the broader context of the American legal system. An overview of the organization of criminal courts in Federal and state jurisdictions is provided. The courts' relationship to law enforcement and social control is also examined. Prerequisite: CJ 205. Offered spring of even-numbered years.

CJ 385 Applied Criminal Profiling (4)

Approaches criminal behavior as a complex phenomenon, moving beyond the abstract interpretation and suggestions of criminological theory into the real-life processes of criminal behavior. Examines and profiles the offender, victim, and situational elements surrounding the major forms of crime. Attention is given to the precipitating, attracting, and predisposing factors of criminal behavior and their levels of importance for respective cases. Prerequisite: CJ 301. Offered each spring.

CJ 387 Criminal Law (4)

An overview of the power and limits of government authority to define, prohibit, grade, and punish socially harmful behavior. Includes the nature of criminal law, classification of crimes and criminal liability, punishment, and more. Prerequisite: senior/junior status. Offered each semester.

CJ 388 Global Terrorism and Homeland Security (4)

An overview of the characteristics, causes and controls of global terrorism along with responses to it. Attention is given to counterterrorist responses, including U.S. Homeland Security. Prerequisites: two criminal justice courses. Offered fall of odd-numbered years.

CJ 389 Criminal Investigation (4)

An introduction to the general processes of criminal investigation that engages students' critical analysis of how and why crimes are committed. Students learn basic investigation techniques and responsibilities. Prerequisite: two criminal justice courses. Offered each spring.

CJ 393 Technical Reporting in Law Enforcement (4) (W)

Focuses on the special needs of the criminal justice system with regard to technical report writing. Using police-oriented language and scenarios, students learn how to structure reports for use in criminal investigations and in court. Prerequisites: successful completion of ENG 105 with a grade of C or higher and CJ 389 or consent; CJ 387 helpful. Offered fall of even-numbered years.

CJ 400 Topics in Criminal Justice and Sociology (4)

An advanced seminar addressing announced topics in criminal justice and sociology. Topics may include victimology, administration of justice, criminalistics, sociology of terrorism, community systems, war, peace and conflict, sociology of environment, consumerism, child welfare, and more. May be repeated for credit as designated topics change. Prerequisite: consent. Identical to SOC 400. Offered as topics become available.

CJ 420 Criminal Law: The Appellate Process (4) (W)

Provides students with an understanding of a criminal appeal. While reviewing an actual criminal trial transcript, students develop legal issues for an appeal, then prepare a legal brief for an appellate court's review. Emphasizes the creation of a well-reasoned argument within the context of a legal brief. Prerequisites: successful completion of ENG 105 with a grade of C or higher, CJ 387, junior/senior status, and consent. Offered fall of odd-numbered years.

CJ 460 Readings in Criminal Justice (2-4)

Students select a topic concerning criminal justice theory or research, survey the relevant literature, and discuss their findings with their major professor. (Two or four semester hours depending on the scope of the project.) May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: prior consent of the project advisor. Offered each semester.

CJ 483 Internship Preparation Course (2)

Designed for students intending to participate in an internship for sociology or criminal justice credit. The process of selecting an internship site, completing applications and forms, and understanding the requirements set forth by the Department of Sociology and Criminal Justice can be overwhelming. Lectures and scenario training provide students with practical information that should be beneficial to students who desire an internship in SOC/CJ. Prerequisite: consent of internship director. Identical to SOC 483. Offered each fall.

CJ 484 Internship in Criminal Justice and Sociology (8)

Practiced, supervised experience in direct student learning in applied social settings. Students learn how acquired knowledge and research writing skills can be applied to the workplace. Practical and applied learning through student performance in the applied setting gives the student a "competitive edge" for future community/workplace contribution. Prerequisites: 18 hours of sociology or criminal justice and CJ 483 or SOC 483. Students must contact the department faculty to review full eligibility for this course. Identical to SOC 484. Offered each spring.

CJ 489 Senior Integrative Assessment (4) (I)

Students assess and analyze the connectedness of their academic learning in light of their future goals. Contemporary topics take a holistic and systematic perspective focusing on a variety of issues such as justice, ethics, and community needs. Prerequisite: junior/senior status. Juniors need consent from the instructor. Identical to SOC 489. Offered each fall.

CJ EL1 Elective (0.1-6)

CJ EL2 Elective (0.1-6)

CJ EL3 Elective (0.1-6)

CJ EL4 Elective (0.1-6)

CJ EL5 Elective (0.1-6)

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