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Course Descriptions

PSY 101 Introduction to Psychology I (4)

The first part of the introductory psychology course and a prerequisite for other psychology courses. Covers research methods, theoretical perspectives, biological foundations of behavior, sensory and perceptual processes, cognition, learning, memory, and consciousness. Intended for freshmen and sophomores. Offered each fall.

PSY 102 Introduction to Psychology II (4)

The second part of the introductory psychology sequence and a prerequisite for other psychology courses. Behavior in Context covers development, motivation, emotion, personality, social psychology, psychological disorders, and industrial/organizational and health psychology. Intended for freshmen and sophomores. Offered each spring.

PSY 205 Lifespan Developmental Psychology (4)

Development of the individual across the lifespan, from conception to death. Surveys the biological bases and social contexts of developmental processes, including theory, research and practical applications. Prerequisite: PSY 101, 102, or 201. Offered fall of even-numbered years.

PSY 210 Statistical Analysis in Psychology (4)

Examines the role of data analysis in psychological research, especially the fit of analysis techniques with data collection methods and research design. Emphasizes selection of the appropriate statistic, computation, and interpretation of results. Includes the application of computer software for data management, analysis, and graphing. Prerequisites: sophomore/junior status, completion of the general studies math requirement, declared major in psychology or consent. Offered each fall.

PSY 220 Research Methods in Psychology (4)

Students prepare an empirical research proposal that reflects understanding of the scientific method as an approach to studying psychological phenomena. Focuses on using the professional literature, the logic of empirically based inquiry, selection of appropriate data-gathering strategies, ethical research responsibilities, and the review process for human subjects clearance. Prerequisites: sophomore/junior status and at least 8 semester hours in psychology, including PSY 210, or consent. Offered each spring.

PSY 227 Social Psychology (4)

Explores our development as socialized human beings is shaped through our interactions with groups of other people and how the structure and function of both the formal and informal groups that exist in a society are shaped by the personalities of the individuals who comprise their membership. Students discover both academically and experientially the nature of such group-related psychological dynamics as attitude formation, interpersonal attraction, social conflict, and bureaucratic organization. Prerequisite: PSY 102, 201, or SOC 100. Identical to SOC 227. Offered each fall.

PSY 256 Abnormal Psychology (4)

The various categories of disturbed behavior are described in terms of their defining symptom patterns. Causes, diagnosis, treatment, and prevention are also discussed. Prerequisite: PSY 101, 102, or 201. Offered each spring.

PSY 285 Theories of Personality (4)

A survey of the major theoretical descriptions of personality structure, beginning with Freud's psychodynamic model and tracing developments thereafter through exposure to significant alternative viewpoints. Prerequisites: PSY 101, 102, or 201. Offered each fall.

PSY 290 Guided Study/Independent Research (3)

PSY 303 Resident Community Leadership (1)

Resident Assistants (RAs) develop their skills as peer counselors and group leaders. RAs share their experiences through group discussions and structured processes. Enrollment limited to current Resident Assistants. Pass/fail grading. Offered each semester.

PSY 313 Clinical Neuropsychology (4)

Facilitates learning about the connections and interactions between neuroanatomy and functioning of the brain and neuropsychological disorders. Considers how clinical neuropsycholgists assess, diagnose, and treat dysfunctions in these areas. Prerequisites: PSY 101, 102 or 201 and junior/senior status. Offered fall of odd-numbered years.

PSY 321 Industrial/Organizational Psychology (4)

Presents an overview of individual, environmental, and organizational factors that affect job-related behavior. Topics include selection, testing, motivation, job satisfaction, job analysis, performance evaluation, safety and violence in the workplace, stress, leadership, and engineering psychology. Prerequisites: junior/senior status and PSY 101, 102, 201, or consent. Offered spring of even-numbered years.

PSY 333 Assessment of Individual Differences (4)

An examination of the theoretical and practical considerations involved in the construction, administration, and interpretation of psychological tests to measure such factors as achievement, aptitudes, interests, and personality structure. Prerequisites: PSY 101, 102 or 201 and junior/senior status. Offered fall of odd-numbered years.

PSY 351 Psychology of Gender (4)

Explores how being born into one gender category and not the other has a profound impact on how individuals are treated, what they expect of themselves, and how they lead their lives. Takes a psychological approach to critically examine sex and gender differences across a variety of life domains. Prerequisites: PSY 101, PSY 102, or PSY 201 and junior/senior status. Offered spring of even-numbered years.

PSY 354 Clinical Psychology (4) (W)

Invites students to explore the field of clinical psychology by examining the roles of clinicians and critically exploring various therapeutic techniques in use today. Students engage in readings, discussions, role-plays, viewing videos of therapy, and writing to explore the multi-faceted world of psychotherapy. Prerequisites: PSY 101, 102, or 201 and junior/senior status. Offered spring of even-numbered years.

PSY 372 Infant Development (4)

An overview of biological, psychological, and environmental influences on human development from conception through toddlerhood, current psychological theories and research. Prerequisites: PSY 101, PSY 102, or PSY 201 and junior/senior status. Offered spring of even-numbered years.

PSY 375 Adult Development and Aging (4)

An overview of environmental, cultural, and biological influences on adult development and aging, focusing on gains and losses and covering current psychological theories and research. Prerequisites: PSY 101, 102 or 201 and junior/senior status. Offered fall of odd-numbered years.

PSY 385 Psychology of Eating Disorders (4)

Explores the psychology of eating disorders through readings, discussion, lectures, student research and presentations, and visits by clinicians. Students examine the pathology of eating disorders, as well as risk and protective factors for these disorders. Issues investigated include comorbidity with other disorders, etiology, neurobiology, and treatment and prevention. Prerequisites: PSY 101, 102 or 201 and junior/senior status, or consent. Offered Winter Sessions of even-numbered years.

PSY 450 Evolutionary Psychology (4)

Examines how evolution has shaped behavioral, cognitive, and emotional mechanisms to help our hunter/gatherer ancestors cope with recurrent evolutionary problems. Students discuss why evolutionary approaches have met with such controversy, implications for understanding behavior in contemporary environments, and how culture and our evolved minds interact to produce behaviors. Prerequisites: PSY 101, 102 or 201 and junior/senior status. Offered fall of odd-numbered years.

PSY 469 Uncertainty, Self, and Society (4)

Explores how, in today's society, people must prepare for and adapt to rapid and dramatic changes in the world around them. Critically examines the meaning and role of psychological uncertainty in our personal lives and in society overall. Prerequisites: PSY 101, 102 or 201 and junior/senior status. Offered spring of even-numbered years.

PSY 477 History and Systems of Modern Psychology (4) (I)

An examination of psychology's evolution from its roots in vintage philosophical and biological concerns to its present diversity of research directions and areas of application that reveals the issues of substance and methodology that have systematically developed. Emphasizes analysis, synthesis, and evaluation of information. Especially useful to the psychology major seeking to identify a topic for the original research project (see PSY 480) and the non-major interested in an advanced but general coverage of fundamental psychological trends and perspectives. Prerequisite: junior/senior status. Offered each fall.

PSY 479 Internship in Psychology (4)

Students work independently in an agency, organization, department, or other applied setting that allows for hands-on application of concepts and skills developed during the coursework in psychology. Students meet together weekly to process their experiences and complete integrative projects regarding their experiences at the end of the semester. Prerequisites: PSY 220; junior/senior psychology major; minimum GPA of 2.5; consent. Offered spring of odd-numbered years.

PSY 480 Original Research Project (4) (W)

Students conduct an independent empirical study, prepare a paper on their research, and defend the effort in an oral examination before a committee comprised of the project advisor, one other psychology faculty member, and one faculty member outside of psychology. Prerequisites: senior psychology major, ENG 105 with a grade of C or higher, PSY 210, PSY 220, and approval by project advisor.

PSY 489 Social Cognition (4)

Explores the ways that people make sense of their social worlds. Classic and contemporary scholarship from four main perspectives is integrated to form an understanding of six key phenomena: prejudice, attitudes, self and identity, attributions, social perceptions, and ideology. Prerequisites: PSY 101, 102 or 201 and junior/senior status. Offered fall of odd-numbered years.

PSY EL1 Elective (0.1-10)

PSY EL2 Elective (0.1-10)

PSY EL3 Psychology elective (1-6)

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