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Course Descriptions

POLS 103 Global Realities (4) (S)

Designed for students who want to begin learning about international relations. Begins with a broad overview of political, economic, and cultural patterns in today's global environment; followed by an inventory, evaluation, and comparison of information sources about international affairs, including print, broadcast, and cable media, the Internet, and CD-ROM and simulation software. Concludes with one or more case studies of current global issues, such as international terrorism, the control of rogue states, denuclearizing warfare, international women's issues, international environmental problems, and the impact of global consumerism. Through these case studies, students learn how to identify key international problems, track them in the media, gather information about them, and develop and evaluate possible solutions. Offered each spring.

POLS 111 Introduction to Political Science (4) (S)

Introduces students to the fundamental concepts and issues in the study of politics. Primary emphasis is placed on ideologies, such as liberal democracy, conservatism, socialism, communism, fascism, nationalism, and on political institutions and behavior, including legislatures, executives, interest groups, political parties, political socialization, participation, the expression of political opinion, revolution, and types of political systems. These concepts and issues are considered from both behavioral and traditional perspectives. Offered each fall.

POLS 112 Introduction to American Government (4) (S)

Offers a citizen's guide to the American political system, providing a brief overview of the Founders' constitutional design, the federal system, and politics and policy-making in the presidency, bureaucracy, Congress, and the Supreme Court. Covers key judicial rulings on civil rights and liberties and national powers. Gives special attention to the electoral process, the media, and the ways that ordinary citizens can influence governmental policies. Offered each fall.

POLS 202 Ethnicity and Politics: Latinos in America (4) (S)

A study of how Latinos have adapted to U.S. political ways in order to participate in U.S. politics and prss their political agenda. Offered spring of odd-numbered years.

POLS 203 Politics and Literature (4) (V)

Provides a literary path to exploring the human experience and discovering the role politics plays in that experience. Through readings and discussion of classical utopian and dystopian novels, students explore argruments and concepts detailed in classic political philosophy. Offered each fall.

POLS 206 Introduction to Comparative Politics (4) (S)

An introduction to cross-national comparative analysis, with particular attention to social movements, democratization, globalization, and the relative political and economic autonomy of the countries examined. Country cases include Britain, Germany, India, Iran, Mexico, Nigeria, and the United States. Students engaged in cross-country case-studies compare and contrast major political and economic institutions, political culture, parties and interest groups, and discuss class-based perspectives on political conflicts over wealth distribution and social justice. Offered spring of odd numbered years.

POLS 210 Introduction to International Relations (4) (S)

Drawing on both historical and contemporary experience, students study the behavioral and institutional features of the nation-state and its global environment in their political, military, economic, and cultural aspects. Main topics include power, foreign policy, diplomacy, international organization and law, arms control, and the global economy considered in the context of the post-Cold-War world. Issues examined include overpopulation, food and energy scarcity, national and ethnic movements, economic development, environmental problems, and militarism. Offered each fall.

POLS 220 Comparative Politics: Latin America (4) (H)

Examines major problems of political and economic modernization by considering Latin American political systems in their various approaches to development. Focus is on key examples of the successes and failures of the various developmental strategies: e.g., Cuba, Chile, Peru, Brazil, and Mexico. Further, the impact of United States' policies upon the region as a whole receives special attention. Offered each spring.

POLS 238 Comparative Politics of the Middle East and North Africa (4)

Offers students a basic understanding of broad trends of social change, state building, and economic development in the modern Middle East and North Africa (MENA) during the post-World War I period. Attends to distinctions across MENA states along these three major dimensions, with special attention to public and private responses to modernization, democratization, and globalization. Offered spring of odd-numbered years.

POLS 250 Introduction to International Political Economy (4) (S)

An overview of the political institutions and conflicts that structure our contemporary international economy. Readings and discussions examine major issues at the center of current political science research, policy debate and popular political discourse. Postwar systems of international trade and finance, as well as divergent policy goals of states and societies of the North and South are examined. Offered fall of even-numbered years.

POLS 265 Research Methods (4)

Introduces the political science major to the methods of political research. Students learn how political scientists know what they know, and how they gain tools with which to explore, describe, explain, present, and debate this knowledge. Students actively experience every dimension of the research process as they plan, design, and carry out their own projects, then communicate their findings in written and oral formats. Daily classes include lecture and discussion of class readings, and individual student research. Offered each fall.

POLS 302 Ethnicity and Politics: Latinos in America (4) (S)

A study of how Latinos have adapted to U.S. political ways in order to participate in U.S. politics and prss their political agenda. Offered spring of odd-numbered years.

POLS 307 The Presidency and the American Political System (4)

Focuses on the institutions and processes of American government in regard to the presidency. Offered intermittently.

POLS 320 Comparative Politics: Latin America (4)

Examines major problems of political and economic modernization by considering Latin American political systems in their various approaches to development. Focus is on key examples of the successes and failures of the various developmental strategies: e.g., Cuba, Chile, Peru, Brazil, and Mexico. Further, the impact of United States' policies upon the region as a whole receives special attention. Offered each spring.

POLS 321 Political Writings of Latin America (4)

Focuses on readings from the political writings of selected Latin American thinkers. Students analyzes writings that range in time from the Spanish Conquest to the present time providing a historical overview of the development of the political thought in Latin America. Identical to SPAN 321 in which case readings and writing are done in Spanish. Offered each fall.

POLS 326 Environmental Policy Analysis (4) (S,W)

Examines environmental politics and policy by studying a set of substantive environmental policy issues to establish the issue context, define the policy problems and evaluate alternative solutions. Identical to ENVS 326. Offered each semester.

POLS 335 American Government (4) (S)

Acquaints students with the workings of our system of federal government. The Constitution, the presidency, Congress, the Supreme Court, political parties and the regulatory agencies are treated as separate units of a unified focus upon our institutions of national government. Offered each fall.

POLS 338 Comparative Politics of the Middle East and North Africa (4)

Offers students a basic understanding of broad trends of social change, state building, and economic development in the modern Middle East and North Africa (MENA) during the post-World War I period. Attends to distinctions across MENA states along these three major dimensions, with special attention to public and private responses to modernization, democratization, and globalization. Offered spring of odd-numbered years.

POLS 343 Public Administration (4) (S)

Contemporary approaches to policy-making and decision-making techniques are reviewed in light of the values represented in them and their promises for serving the public interest. We review classic and modern theories of bureaucracy; the history, development, and philosophical assumptions of the science of administration; the structure and functioning of American federal, state, and local administration; the budget-making process; government regulations of business and society; and the major challenges facing governmental professionals in our time. Offered each spring.

POLS 345 International Law & Organizations (4) (S)

Introduces rules and institutions providing the context for global politics. The course examines how international and non-governmental organizations attempt to establish and protect international standards of political behavior. Special focus is placed on the United Nations, equipping students for participation in the National Model United Nations in New York City. Prerequisite: consent. Offered each spring.

POLS 346 Model United Nations (1)

Provides further emphasis on the operations of the United Nations, including the UN's bureaucratic structure, resolution writing, multilateral diplomacy, and specific issues in contemporary international politics. It guides students' preparations for and participation in the annual National Model United Nations conference. Pass/fail grading. Prerequisite: consent. Offered each spring.

POLS 348 International Human Rights (4) (S,W)

Examines the practical and philosophical questions surrounding civil, political, social, and economic rights, self-determination, and minority rights. Explores the contemporary practice of human rights in policy-making and law, with special emphasis on the role of politics in their interpretation, implementation, and enforcement. Prerequisites: ENG 105 with a grade of C or higher and junior status or consent. Offered on demand.

POLS 371 Constitiutional Law I: The Federal System (4)

An introduction to the American constitutional system. The course examines the sources and allocation of powers among the three branches of the federal government, including the nature and extent of the Supreme Court's authority, as well as the relationship between the federal and state government. Prerequisite: junior/senior status or consent. Offered fall of even-numbered years.

POLS 372 Constitutional Law II: Sutstantive Rights (4)

An introduction to the protection of civil rights and civil liberties within the American constitutional system, including equal protection (race, gender and other forms of discrimination), privacy and personal autonomy, freedom of expression and association, and religious freedom. Prerequisite: junior/senior status or consent. Offered spring of odd-numbered years.

POLS 373 Conflict Management (4) (S,W)

Examines conflict processes within and between organizations and alternative approaches to conflict management, drawing on the contributions of several disciplines and experience in organization, community, and labor dispute management. Prerequisite: ENG 105 with a grade of C or higher. Identical to MBE 373. Offered each fall.

POLS 498 Political Science Internship Program (8-16)

Political science majors apply the knowledge and skills learned in their political science classes in a full-time, semester-long internship. The field experience can be in, but is not limited to, government agencies at the local, state, and federal levels; law, law enforcement, non-profits, political parties, social service. Prerequisites: 6 semester hours of political science or consent. Offered on demand in the spring semester.

POLS 499 Senior Seminar (4) (I)

Required of all students wishing to graduate from Virginia Wesleyan with a major in political science. The course is team taught by members of the department and focuses upon a different topic each spring. Examples of seminars offered in the past are: Democratization and Development; Politics and the Media; War and Peace in the Nuclear Age; Political Development and Changes in Latin America and Asia; and Images of Justice. Open to all students. May be repeated as topics change. Prerequisite: consent. Offered each spring.

POLS EL1 Elective (0.1-10)

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