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Course Descriptions

Course Descriptions

Mathematics

MATH 005 Algebraic Preliminaries (4)

Students develop basic computational and algebraic skills and strengthen their understanding of fundamentals in preparation for courses that involve more difficult quantitative concepts. Students with placement level D must complete this course with a grade of C or higher before attempting MATH 104. Topics include operations on whole and signed numbers, fractions, decimals, exponents, variables, linear equations, and elementary problem solving. Traditional grading only. While students receive no credit for this course, the course grade does count toward their overall grade point average as if it were a 4 semester-hour course. Prerequisite: placement or consent. Offered each semester.

MATH 104 Algebra and its Applications (4)

Presents topics in algebra through traditional and applications-based methods. Topics include proportion, percents, metric and American conversions, linear, exponential and quadratic functions and graphs, exponents, linear equations, system of equations, combinations, permutations, and probability. Prerequisite: placement level C, Math 005 with a grade of C or higher, or consent. Must have a TI-83 or TI-84 graphing calculator. Offered each semester.

MATH 135 Calculus with Precalculus, Part I (4)

Students learn the basic tools of calculus, why they work, and how to apply them in various contexts. Symbolic, graphical, and numerical approaches are considered. Topics include limits, derivatives, and applications. Includes sufficient coverage of functions and trigonometry to support the study of calculus and of other sciences. The two-course sequence, MATH 135 and 136, is sufficient preparation for MATH 172, Calculus II. Prerequisite: placement level B, or MATH 104 with a grade of B or higher, or MATH 105 with a grade of C- or higher, or consent. Offered each fall.

MATH 136 Calculus with Precalculus, Part II (4)

A continuation of MATH 135. Topics include applications of derivatives, the Riemann integral, and the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus. Includes sufficient instruction in advanced algebraic techniques to support the study of calculus. Prerequisite: MATH 135 with a grade of C- or higher or consent. Offered each spring.

MATH 150 Cross-Registration (3)

MATH 171 Calculus I (4)

Students learn the basic tools of calculus, why they work, and how to apply them in various contexts. Calculus I develops the differential calculus through symbolic, graphical, and numerical approaches. Topics include differentiation of algebraic and transcendental functions, applications in modeling and optimization, and the Fundamental Theorem of calculus and an introduction to differential equations. Prerequisite: placement level A or consent. Offered each fall.

MATH 172 Calculus II (4)

A continuation of Calculus I. More advanced techniques are studied and used to solve quantitative problems in various contexts. Topics include integration techniques, applications of definite integration and sequences and series. Prerequisite: MATH 136 or 171 with a grade of C- or higher or consent. Offered each semester.

MATH 205 Discrete Mathematics (4)

The analysis of finite step-by-step processes. Develops reasoning skills, enhances software-writing abilities and introduces elementary computer circuitry. Topics include Boolean algebra, digital logic circuits, the nature of valid argument, mathematical induction, recursive sequences, and counting techniques, including combinatorics methods. Many class examples are drawn from computer science. Prerequisite: MATH 135 with a grade of C- or higher, or placement level H or A, or consent. Identical to CS 205. Offered each spring. Recommended spring freshman year.

MATH 206 Cross-registration (3)

MATH 210 Introductory Statistics (4)

Introduces students to learning from data. Topics include the basics of data production, data analysis, probability, Central Limit Theorem, and statistical inference. Statistical software is used for data management, calculation, and visualization. No previous knowledge of statistics is required. Prerequisites: placement level B or A or H, MATH 104 with a grade C- or higher, or MATH 105 with a grade of C- or higher, or consent. Must have a TI-83 or TI-84 graphing calculator. Offered each semester.

MATH 217 Linear Algebra (4)

The study of linear equations in several variables. Students develop the theoretical structure underlying answers to the questions: When does a solution for a system of linear equations exist? When is it unique? How do we find it? How can we interpret it geometrically? Topics include vectors spaces, linear independence, bases, dimension, transformations, matrices, determinants, and applications. Prerequisite: MATH 172 or consent. Offered each fall.

MATH 225 Priniciples of Mathematics (4)

A study of the nature of mathematical knowledge, the history of mathematics, geometry, elementary number theory, and basic trigonometry. Does not count toward the major in mathematics. Prerequisites: placement level H, A, or B, or MATH 104 or MATH 105 with a grade of C- or higher. Freshmen by consent only. Offered each semester.

MATH 273 Multivariable Calculus (4)

Topics include functions of several variables, curves, surfaces, partial differentiation, multiple integrals, and vector analysis. Prerequisites: MATH 172 or consent. Offered each spring.

MATH 274 Ordinary Differential Equations (4)

Explores the theory and applications of ordinary differential equations and their solutions. Topics include linear and non-linear first order equations, higher order linear equations, series solutions, systems of linear differential equations, Laplace transforms and numerical methods. Prerequisite: MATH 172 or consent. Offered fall of even-numbered years.

MATH 300 Teaching Assistants' Program for Math (1)

Qualified students assist math instructors in teaching their classes. Enrollment is by invitation of the MATH/CS department. Although the course is useful for students seeking certification in secondary education, enrollment is not limited to them. A student may enroll more than once, but may apply no more than 3 semester hours earned in this manner toward graduation. May not be used to satisfy major or minor requirements in mathematics, although one semester of MATH 300 is required for secondary education certification. Prerequisite: consent. Offered each semester.

MATH 301 Combinatorics (4)

An introduction to combinatorics, the mathematical art of counting discrete quantities. Topics include enumeration of combinatorial structures, recursive algorithms, graph theory with applications and algorithms, inclusion-exclusion, and generating functions. Prerequisite: MATH/CS 205, MATH 217, or consent. Offered fall of odd-numbered years.

MATH 310 Statistical Models (4)

A course in applied data analysis. Emphasizes construction of models for authentic data sets. Statistical software is used extensively for analyzing real data sets from various contexts. Topics include parametric and nonparametric tests, simple and multiple regression, and ANOVA. Prerequisites: MATH 106 with a grade B or higher, MATH 210 with a grade B or higher, or MATH 171 with a grade C- or higher, or consent. Offered each spring.

MATH 316 Probability (4)

Approaches probabillity as a discipline with applications throughout mathematics and the sciences. Topics include classical and axiomatic probability, random variables, common distributions, density functions, expectation, conditional probability, independence, the Law of Large Numbers, and the Central Limit Theorem. Prerequisites: MATH 172 and either MATH 205, MATH 226, or consent. Offered fall of odd-numbered years.

MATH 317 Algebraic Structures (4)

An introduction to algebraic structures, including groups and rings, homomorphism theorems, quotient structures, and polynomial rings. Prerequisites: junior/senior status, MATH/CS 205, and 217. Offered spring of even-numbered years.

MATH 340 Modern Geometries (4)

Explores Euclidean and non-Euclidean geometries and the cultural impact of non-Euclidean geometries. Topics include geodesics, plane geometry, including non-Euclidean geometries, finite geometries, complex numbers, and geometric transformations. Prerequisites: MATH 205, 217, or consent. Offered spring of odd-numbered years.

MATH 350 Numerical Methods (4)

Examines efficient methods used in solving numerical problems with the aid of a computer. Topics include floating point arithmetic, interpolation and approximation, integration, roots of nonlinear equations, ordinary differential equations, and systems of linear equations. Prerequisites: MATH 172 and CS 112. Identical to CS 350. Offered spring of even-numbered years.

MATH 408U Cross Registration (3)

MATH 487 Mathematics Senior Seminar (1)

Students read and discuss current journal articles in mathematics. Topics vary and may include problem solving. Pass/fail grading. Prerequisites: declared mathematics major and senior status or consent. Offered each spring.

MATH 489 Research in Mathematics (2-4)

Offers students the opportunity to conduct original scientific research in an area of interest. Students work closely with one or more members of the natural science faculty to develop and conduct a research project, then present their findings orally during the semester's undergraduate research symposium and as a formal research paper. Students are encouraged to present their findings at a conference. Prerequisites: junior/senior status and a major in the natural sciences, prior approval by the project advisor, and consent of the instructor. Students may enroll for 2 or 4 semester hours in a given semester. May be repeated for a maximum of 8 semester hours. Identical to BIO 489, CHEM 489, CS 489, and EES 489. Offered each semester and most Winter Sessions (2 semester hours only).

MATH 492 Guided Study/Independent Research (1-6)

MATH EL2 Elective (1-6)

Computer Science

CS 100 Computer Concepts and Applications (4)

Topics include basic concepts of computer hardware and software; the development of the computer, networks, and the Internet; programming with Alice; Web page development with HTML; application software including word processing, spreadsheet, database, and presentation software; and social concerns associated with the widespread use of computers. Offered each semester.

CS 110 Introduction to Programming with Visual BASIC (4)

An introductory programming course that uses the Visual BASIC programming language. Topics include the program development process, structured programming, data types, assignment, selection, looping, subroutines, one-dimensional arrays, files, and random numbers. Prerequisite: placement level H, A, or B, or a grade of C- or higher in MATH 104, or consent. Offered each spring.

CS 112 Computer Programming I (4)

Java and C++ languages are introduced. Topics include the program development process, structured programming, data types, variables and expressions, input/output, assignment, selection, looping, functions, and arrays. Prerequisite: placement level H, A, or B, or a grade of B or higher in MATH 104, or consent. Offered each fall.

CS 205 Discrete Mathematics (4)

The analysis of finite step-by-step processes. Develops reasoning skills, enhances software-writing abilities and introduces elementary computer circuitry. Topics include Boolean algebra, digital logic circuits, the nature of valid argument, mathematical induction, recursive sequences, and counting techniques, including combinatorics methods. Many class examples are drawn from computer science. Prerequisite: MATH 135 with a grade of C- or higher, or placement level H or A, or consent. Identical to MATH 205. Offered each spring. Recommended spring freshman year.

CS 212 Computer Programming II (4)

A continuation of CS 112, topics include advanced programming design in user-defined data types, arrays, structures, pointers, array-based lists, binary searching, recursion, and introduction to object-oriented programming techniques. Prerequisite: CS 112 or consent. Offered each spring.

CS 310 Introduction to Computer Systems (4)

Introduces the basic concepts of computer organization and assembly language. Specific topics include CPU and memory organization, machine language, addressing techniques, macros, program segmentation and linkage, and assembler construction. Satisfies the oral competency requirement for computer science majors. Prerequisite: CS 212 or consent. Offered fall of odd-numbered years.

CS 350 Numerical Methods (4)

Examines efficient methods used in solving numerical problems with the aid of a computer. Topics include floating point arithmetic, interpolation and approximation, integration, roots of nonlinear equations, ordinary differential equations, and systems of linear equations. Prerequisites: MATH 172 and CS 112. Identical to MATH 350. Offered spring of even-numbered years.

CS 380 Programming Languages (4)

Introduces students to the historical development of programming languages and to the decisions involved in the design and implementation of such programming language features as elementary, structured, and user-defined data types, subprograms, sequence control, data control, and storage management. Selected features of several existing languages are examined in the context of these issues. Prerequisite: CS 212 or consent. Offered on demand.

CS 391 Guided Study/Independent Research (1-6)

CS 480 Advanced Topics in Computer Science (4)

An in-depth study of an area of advanced computer science. Specific content varies according to the interests of students and the instructor. May be repeated for credit as the topic varies. Prerequisites: CS 212 and consent. Offered spring of even-numbered years.

CS 489 Research in Computer Science (2-4)

Offers students the opportunity to conduct original research in an area of interest. Students work closely with one or more faculty members to develop and conduct a research project, then present their findings orally during the semester's undergraduate research symposium and as a formal research paper. They are encouraged to present their findings at a conference. Prerequisites: junior/senior status, major in computer science, prior approval by the project advisor, and consent. Students may enroll for 2 or 4 semester hours in a given semester. May be repeated for a total of 8 semester hours. Identical to BIO 489, CHEM 489, and EES 489. Offered each semester and most Winter Sessions (2 semester hours only).

CSC 422 Cross registration (3)

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