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Course Descriptions

HIST 100 Study Abroad (1-6)

HIST 111 World History to A.D. 1600 (4)

A study of selected topics in history from the emergence of early cultures to the 16th century. Emphasizes the variety of human societies and the ways in which Old World societies influenced one another. Prerequisite: freshman/sophomore status or consent. Offered each fall.

HIST 112 World History: The Modern Era (4)

Explores world history since 1600, focusing on intercultural exploration and appreciation. Examines many critical political events in world history, including the two world wars. Students also learn about key historical trends such as the waning of traditional societies, industrialization, Marxism, nationalism, and imperialism. Significant attention is devoted to studying cultural developments, especially how ordinary people experienced major historical events. Prerequisite: freshman/sophomore status or consent. Offered each spring.

HIST 113 History of U.S. to 1877 (2)

A brief survey of the first half of American history, from early Native American history to Reconstruction. Designed for students who need only one half of the American history survey to fulfill a graduation requirement. Students may not take HIST 113 and 116 for credit. Offered on demand.

HIST 114 History of the US since 1877 (2)

A brief survey of the second half of American history, from Reconstruction to the present. Designed for students who need only one half of the American survey to fulfill a graduation requirement. Students may not take both HIST 114 and 116 for credit. Offered on demand.

HIST 116 History of the United States (4)

A survey of the history of the United States from approximately 1400 to the present. Examines the major political, social, cultural, intellectual, religious, and economic trends over the course of the nation's history. Designed primarily to fulfill state competency requirements for prospective teachers. Offered each semester.

HIST 219 Topics in Asian History (4) (H)

An examination of selected topics in the history of Asia that varies from year to year and focuses on such areas as China, Japan, India, and the Near East. May be repeated for credit as designated topics change. Offered spring of odd-numbered years or on demand.

HIST 220 The Civil War and Reconstruction (4) (H)

Examines the causes, experience, significance, and lasting legacies of the Civil War and Reconstruction. Topics include the ongoing crisis of sectionalism and nationalism, the political, ideological, and moral conflict over slavery, the impact of expansionism, the ideological development of a revolutionary South, and the impact of the war on national politics, culture, and memory. Heavy emphasis is given to the war itself: the battles, leaders, common soldiers, tactics, diplomacy, and economics of this great conflict. Finally, students explore the mixed results of this war for the victorious North, the defeated South, and the restored nation during Reconstruction and beyond. Offered spring of even-numbered years.

HIST 250 Topics in History (4) (H)

Applies skills in historical analysis to a variety of geographical, chronological, cultural, social, and political topics. Students learn how societies change over time, analyzing primary documents in their historical context, and developing independent arguments based on primary sources. Requires an 8-10 page paper based on primary source evidence. Topics for HIST 250 sections are available from the History Department before registration begins each semester. May be repeated for additional credit as topics change. Prerequisite/corequisite: ENG 105. Prerequisite for Winter Session: successful complete of ENG 105 with a grade of C or higher. Offered each semester.

HIST 260 Introduction to Historiography (4)

Students analyze the differing schools that have developed around various historical questions and learn how to enter into historical debates by engaging other historians. They also are exposed to some of the most important methodologies in the discipline of history. Prerequisite: history or social studies major or history minor. Offered each spring.

HIST 286 Banned Books (4)

An interdisciplinary exploration of banned books; the legal battles in U.S. history that created, supported, and ended censorship; and the literary, legal, aesthetic, and socio-political contexts that influenced both the artists and the changing conceptions of obscenity that marked their works as controversial. Students may not also receive credit for ENG 286. Offered in selected Winter Sessions and spring semesters.

HIST 306 Seminar in Asian History (4) (H)

An intensive overview of Mongolian political, economic, social, and cultural history from the rise of Chinghis Khan's global empire through the collapse of Communism. Focuses on empire, warfare, revolution, and national consolidation. Includes consideration of intangible cultural heritage and traditional music and dance. Offered fall of odd-numbered years.

HIST 313 19th-Century America (4) (H)

An intensive exploration of major themes, events, and individuals in United States history between Thomas Jefferson's presidency and the Spanish-American War. Topics include territorial and governmental expansion, the politics of slavery and freedom, the Civil War and its aftermath, the industrial revolution, urbanization, imperial adventurism, and other transformations that marked this tumultuous and fascinating time in history. Emphasizes historiographical interpretations of the historical changes and their meanings. Prerequisite: sophomore/junior/senior status. Offered fall of even-numbered years.

HIST 314 First and Second Great Awakenings (4) (H,W)

A study of the social, cultural, religious, and demographic causes and consequences of the First and Second Great Awakenings. Prerequisites: ENG 105 with a grade of C or higher and sophomore/junior/senior status. Offered spring of even-numbered years.

HIST 316 Medieval Europe (4) (H)

A survey of the cultural, religious, political, and economic changes that Europe underwent from the "fall" of Rome to the Black Death. Prerequisite: sophomore/junior/senior status. Offered spring of odd-numbered years.

HIST 317 History of Virginia (4) (H)

An exploration of the history of the Commonwealth of Virginia. Topics include Powhatan culture, early colonial life, the origins of slavery and the construction of race, gentry and slave culture, the Civil War, and the twentieth century. May require field trips to historic sites. Prerequisite: sophomore/junior/senior status. Offered each fall.

HIST 319 Early Modern Europe, 1300-1789 (4) (W)

An investigation of European history during the transition from medieval to modern forms of political, cultural, religious, and social dimensions of life. The course explores the concept "early modern" as it emerged in the Renaissance, Reformation, and Enlightenment movements. Prerequisites: successful completion of ENG 105 with a grade of C or higher and sophomore/junior/senior status. Offered spring even-numbered years.

HIST 322 Religion and Social Issues in America History (4)

Examines, from an interdisciplinary vantage point, crucial social issues in American history such as slavery and issues of racial equality, and the status of women. This course explores the religious influences, background and context of these social issues which have had a profound effect on American history and continue to reverberate in American society today. Prerequisites: completed at least 6 semester hours in history, religious studies, political science, English, interdisciplinary studies, philosophy or sociology and junior status or consent. Offered on demand.

HIST 325 Radicalism, Terrorism, and Violence in American History (4) (H,W)

An examination of dissent, radical politics, terrorism, and political violence in American history. Radicalism in all forms in American history is studied from the colonial era to the present. We examine the impact and influence of historically important forms of violence, political crime, and state repression on American politics, culture, society, and economy. Students examine the rise of different radical political ideologies and parties, mob violence, slave uprisings, filibusters, lynching, vigilantism, strikes, police and military repression, assassination, terrorism of the left and right, apocalyptic sects, the role of violence in producing or forestalling social change and reform, etc. We also discuss and dissect the different theoretical approaches developed by historians to explain the meaning of radicalism, terrorism, and violence in American history. Prerequisite: sophomore/junior/senior status. Offered fall of odd-numbered years.

HIST 328 United States Foreign Relations, 1763-1919 (4) (H,W)

An examination of the major themes, events, ideas, and consequences of American foreign policy from the French and Indian Wars through Woodrow Wilson's attempt to re-shape international relations in the aftermath of World War I. Emphasizes the strategic, ideological, economic, sectional, and racial dimensions of U.S. relations with other nations and peoples, and the connections between foreign and domestic politics. Prerequisite: sophomore/junior/senior status. Offered spring of odd-numbered years.

HIST 346 History of South Africa (4) (S)

An exploration of the South African past, from earliest settlement by African and European peoples through the British Colonial and Afrikaner union periods, to the establishment and dismantling of apartheid in the 20th century. Prerequisite: sophomore/junior/senior status. Offered fall of even-numbered years.

HIST 347 History of Modern France (4) (H,W)

Focuses on France's attempts to achieve "liberty, equality, and fraternity," exploring the history of France from the beginning of the 18th century to the present. Examines the various political regimes, beginning with Absolutism under Louis XIV, through the series republics and the two Napoleonic empires. Emphasizes the many revolutions that have left indelible stamps on the history of France. The political narrative is supplemented by a social analysis of French society, including the history of the working classes, women, Jews, and immigrants. Examines the cultural milestones in French history, in popular culture, and in national political symbolism. Prerequisites: ENG 105 with a grade of C or higher and sophomore/junior/senior status. Offered on demand.

HIST 348 History of Modern Germany (4) (H)

Explores the meaning of modern Germany since its unification as a modern nation-state in 1871. Topics include the political outline of German hisory, the social and cultural histories of Germany, German identity, ethnic groups, the Holocaust, and Germany's national borders. Prerequisite: sophomore/junior/senior status. Offered spring of even-numbered years.

HIST 360 Junior Research Seminar (4) (W)

Designed to provide history majors with skills for producing research within the discipline, culminating the following fall semester in HIST 460. Students begin the process of designing their research project, produce a historiographical review of their topic, and craft a research proposal for review and discussion. Prerequisites: ENG 105 with a grade of C or higher, a declared major in history or social studies, and sophomore/junior/senior status. Offered each spring.

HIST 380 Dos Passos' USA (4) (H)

An intensive exploration of John Dos Passos' great trilogy, U.S.A.: The 42nd Parallel: 1919: The Big Money. Students read and discuss the books, explore and evaluate Dos Passos' innovative narrative and experimental styles, his political agenda and social critique, his understanding of the flow of American history, his enduring appeal, and his great utility to the student of American history. Using the books as a guide, they construct an understanding of the American experience before, during and after the First World War and gain insight into the connections between literature and history and between art and memory. Offered in selected Winter Sessions.

HIST 381 The South of Erskine Caldwell (4)

An intensive reading and discussion seminar which explores the tenor of early 20th century Southern life and culture through the fiction and non-fiction works of Erskine Caldwell, a much-overlooked genius of American letters. Caldwell stands alongside William Faulkner as one of the two most important interpreters of life, culture, and society in the South during the early 20th century. In his highly readable works, Caldwell straddled the lines between sharp social commentary and popular fiction, high art and reportage. By focusing on the lives of ordinary Southerners, Caldwell explored race, class, and gender in a South wracked by industrialization, social upheaval, racial violence, and the Great Depression. Rural Southern life, the race question in the South, radical Georgia politics, social change during the Great Depression, and the broader flow of events in American history between 1900 and 1945 are covered along with other important topics. Prerequisite: sophomore/junior/senior status. Offered in selected Winter Sessions.

HIST 417 History of the Old South (4) (H)

An intensive study of life, politics, culture, economics, gender, and race in the American South between the early colonial era and the Civil War. Topics include life in the Antebellum South; the experience of the frontier, mountain, Tidewater, piedmont, and Gulf Coast; the complex relationships among Black, White and Native Americans; the notion of Southern honor; the interplay of sectionalism, radicalism, Southern nationalism, and expansionism; and the experience of plantation life for master and slave. Students analyze an array of historiographical interpretations and schools of thought on the history of the Old South. Prerequisite: senior status or consent. Offered fall of odd-numbered years.

HIST 418 History of the New South (4) (H)

An intensive study of life, politics, culture, economics, gender, and the race question in the American South between the end of Reconstruction and the end of World War II. Topics include the shifting legacies of the Civil War and of Reconstruction, the Jim Crow segregation system, New South ideology, and the life and working experiences of Southerners. Students analyze an array of historiographical interpretations and schools of thought on the history, meaning, and memory of the New South. Prerequisites: 3 semester hours in history and senior status or consent.

HIST 425 Brother Can You Spare a Paintbrush? The Arts Programs of the New Deal (4) (I)

Students use the creative projects and administrative documents available in online archives to pursue intensive research and analysis of the arts programs of the Works Progress Administration. They examine the cultural, social, and political significance of these projects in the context of one of the most dynamic and fasinating periods in modern American history. They also create New Deal-style art, individually and in groups, which is presented to the campus community at the end of the Winter Session. Prerequisite: senior status. Offered in selected Winter Sessions.

HIST 433 Globalization and Empire in American History (4) (I)

Examines the development of globalization and American empire in the capitalist world system. Students engage different theoretical approaches developed by interdisciplinary scholars and historians to explain the efforts of the United States to shape and dominate an increasingly interconnected and interdependent world. Offered fall of even numbered years.

HIST 440 Seminar in American History (4)

Intensive study of selected topics that vary from semester to semester. May be repeated for credit as designated topics change. Prerequisite: senior status or consent. Offered on demand.

HIST 450 Seminar in European History (4)

Intensive study of selected topics that vary from semester to semester. Prerequisite: senior status or consent. Offered on demand.

HIST 451 History of the Holocaust (4) (I)

Examines the Holocaust from a variety of perspectives based on the General Studies Frames of Reference. Topics include the history of anti-Semitism, the emergence of racial ideologies at the end of the 19th century, the conditions that contributed to the rise of the Nazi Party, and the memory of the Holocaust. Includes a class project that commemorates Kristalnacht on November 9, which develops students' historical knowledge, communication skills, and aesthetic sensibilities. Prerequisite: consent. Offered fall of odd-numbered years.

HIST 460 Senior Thesis Seminar (4) (W)

A workshop in which senior history majors apply previous learning. Each student selects a historical problem, develops appropriate research methodology, and carries out the project under faculty supervision and in close contact with other members of the seminar. Students are encouraged to consider a variety of approaches to historical investigation, including oral history, quantification, and archival research. Prerequisite: ENG 105 with a grade of C or higher, senior status, and HIST 360 or consent. Offered each fall.

HIST EL. History Elective (0.1-6)

HIST EL.. History elective (0.01-10)

HIST EL... History Elective (0.01-10)

HIST ELECT1 Hist elect trans (LowerLevel) (3) (H)

HIST ELECT2 Hist elect trans (UpperLevel) (3) (H)

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