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Course Descriptions

FR 111 Beginning French I (4)

An introduction to French as a spoken and written language. Emphasizes the development of oral and written skills and cultural awareness. Four classes each week. Offered each year.

FR 112 Beginning French II (4)

An introduction to French as a spoken and written language. Emphasizes the development of oral and written skills and cultural awareness. Prerequisite: FR 111 with a grade of C or higher or proficiency as determined by the instructor. Five classes each week. Offered each year.

FR 213 Intermediate French (4)

Develops speaking and writing proficiency through active learning and intensive practice. Prerequisite: FR 112 or equivalent. Fulfills the foreign language requirement. Offered each fall.

FR 300+ Study Abroad (3)

FR 307 Topics in Advanced Conversation and Composition (4)

Designed to help students reach advanced proficiency while offering an introduction to French society today, French history, the arts, and more. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: FR 213 or equivalent or consent. Offered each year.

FR 334 Introduction to French Cinema (4) (A)

Introduces students to French cinema from its origins to the present, beginning with the birth of the motion picture in France, then exploring several significant film movements, including major directors and seminal films associated with them. Poetic realism, the New Wave, the heritage film, beur cinema, contemporary blockbusters, and more are examined. Taught in English, with 300-level language coursework for French majors and minors. Offered in selected semesters.

FR 335 Masterpieces of French Literature (4) (W)

Introduces students to French literature from its origins to the present day through a representative sample of authors and literary masterpieces. Emphasizes modernist literature from Baudelaire to Marguerite Duras. Prerequisite: FR 307 or consent. Offered alternate years.

GER 100 Study Abroad (3-6)

GER 111 Beginning German I (4)

An introduction to the German language and culture. Special attention is given to cultural aspects. Emphasizes the development of basic listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills. Audiovisual materials supplement the program. Prerequisite: no previous instruction in German. Offered each year.

GER 112 Beginning German II (4)

An introduction to the German language and culture. Special attention is given to cultural aspects. Emphasizes the development of basic listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills. Audiovisual materials supplement the program. Prerequisite: A grade of C or higher in GER 111 or proficiency as determined by the instructor. Offered each year.

GER 200 Study Abroad (3-6)

GER 205 The Short Prose of Kafka (4) (V)

Examines the short prose of Franz Kafka and its relevance in both literature and film today. Students search for common themes and interpretation in selected works. Taught in English. Identical to GER 305. Offered in selected Winter Sessions. GER 205 (V); GER 305 (V,W).

GER 213 Intermediate German (4)

Continues the instruction of German as a spoken and written language. Extensive oral-aural practice is undertaken in the daily classroom conversation and prepares the student for travel or study abroad. Required lab. Prerequisite: GER 112 or equivalent. Offered each fall.

GER 240 German Cinema: Art and Politics (4) (A)

From early silent films, through the time of Hitler, to the present, German cinema has reflected the challenges and tensions involved when art is shaped by politics. By looking at German film in general--and at the Weimar and New German Cinema in particular--this course focuses on the aesthetics, history, and politics of German cinema. Taught in English. Movies are screened outside of class. Identical to GER 340 and POLS 240/340.

GER 244 German Women Filmmakers: The Search for Identity (4) (A)

Introduces students to the contributions of leading German woman filmmakers. Focuses on filmic innovation and perceptions of women, and specifically on how issues of identity--national, religious, and gender--have been represented by such directors as Doris Dorrie, Caroline Link, and Margarethe von Trotta. Taught in English. Offered in selected Winter Sessions.

GER 305 The Short Prose of Kafka (4) (V,W)

Examines the short prose of Franz Kafka and its relevance in both literature and film today. Students search for common themes and interpretation in selected works. Taught in English. Identical to GER 205. Offered in selected Winter Sessions. GER 205 (V); GER 305 (V,W).

GER 307 Topics in Advanced German Conversation and Composition (4) (W)

Selected topics approach German conversation and composition from various perspectives. For the student who wants to acquire skill in practical conversation and writing. Strongly recommended for those who wish to travel abroad or take upper-level German literature courses. May be repeated for credit as topic varies. Prerequisite: GER 213 or equivalent.

GER 317 Great German Thinkers (4) (H)

Gives the student a well-rounded knowledge of Germany, its people, history, philosophy, literature, and arts from the times of Germanic tribes to the present. Offered on demand.

GER 318 Great German Writers (4)

Provides an overview of literary history of Germany in terms of movements, genres, authors, etc., against the background of German life as a whole. Offered in selected semesters.

GER 329 Modern German Literature (4)

A careful reading and discussion of contemporary German plays, novels and short stories. Authors may include Christa Wolf, Max Frisch, Gûnther Grass and Heinrich Böll, Bernhard Schlink, and Herta Miller. Offered in selected semesters.

GER 340 German Cinema: Art and Politics (4) (A,W)

From early silent films, through the time of Hitler, to the present, German cinema has reflected the challenges and tensions involved when art is shaped by politics. By looking at German film in general-and at the Weimar and New German Cinema in particular-this course focuses on the aesthetics, history, and politics of German cinema. Taught in English. Movies are screened outside of class. Identical to GER 240 and POLS 240/340.

GER 400 Study Abroad (3)

GER 430 The German Comedy (4)

A history and study of the German comedy. Representative readings from Lessing, Kleist, Tieck, Grabbe, Hauptmann, and Sternheim. Offered in selected semesters.

GER 471 Practicum in the Teaching of German (4)

Students study various methods for teaching of grammar, writing, and speaking in German. They also serve as assistants and tutors in GER 111, 112, and 213. Prerequisites: GER 307 or the ability to use the German language effectively and consent. Offered each year.

LATN 111 Beginning Latin I (4)

Introduces the elements of the language of the Ancient Romans: vocabulary, syntax, and grammar. Students learn how to translate sentences and short stories. Focuses on translation and reading skills. Offered each year.

LATN 112 Beginning Latin II (4)

Introduces the elements of the language of the Ancient Romans: vocabulary, syntax, and grammar. Students learn how to translate sentences and short stories. Focuses on translation and reading skills. Prerequisite: LATN 111. May be used toward fulfillment of the language requirement. Offered each year.

LATN 213 Intermediate Latin (4)

Introduces students to advanced grammar as they read a real Latin text such as the poems of Catullus or the speeches of Cicero. The primary goal is to gain facility in reading Latin, but the course also introduces students to ancient Roman literary aesthetics and culture. Focuses on translation and reading skills rather than speaking/listening skills. May be used toward the fullfillment of the language requirement. Prerequisite: LATN 112 or equivalent. Offered each year.

LATN 305 Topics in Latin Prose (4)

Reading and translation from one or more Latin prose authors, arranged by author (e.g., Apuleius) or by topic or genre (e.g., the Roman novel, Arthurian legends, etc.). May be repeated for credit as the topic varies. Prerequisite: LATN 213 or placement. Offered on demand.

LATN 306 Topics in Latin Poetry (4)

Reading and translation from one or more Latin poets, arranged by author (e.g., Virgil) or by topic or genre (e.g., lyric, epic). May be repeated for credit as the topic varies. Prerequisite: LATN 213 or placement. LATN 305 is not a prerequisite. Offered on demand.

SPAN 100 Spanish Study Abroad (1-6)

Students study Spanish and live with Mexican families in a beautiful historically rich city during a three-week stay in Puebla, Mexico. Students attend classes daily from 9:00 a.m. to noon and then return to their families for meals, excursions, and activities. Visits to all sites of cultural interest in and around Puebla, as well as weekend excursions to Veracruz, Oaxaca, and Tlaxcala are provided. This is an opportunity for total immersion in the Spanish language, culture, and life. Offered each summer.

SPAN 104 Beginning Spanish for the Adult Learner I (4)

Designed for students in the Adult Studies Program. Prerequisite: admission to the Adult Studies Program. No previous instruction in Spanish. Offered every year.

SPAN 105 Beginning Spanish for the Adult Learner II (4)

Designed for students in the Adult Studies Program. Prerequisites: admission to the Adult Studies Program and a grade of C or better in SPAN 104 or proficiency as determined by instructor. Offered every year.

SPAN 111 Beginning Spanish I (4)

An introduction to the Spanish language and culture. Focuses on cultural aspects. Emphasizes the development of basic listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills. Audiovisual materials supplement the program. Prerequisite: No previous instruction in Spanish. Offered each year.

SPAN 112 Beginning Spanish II (4)

An introduction to the Spanish language and culture. Focues on cultural aspects. Emphasizes on the development of basic listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills. Audiovisual materials supplement the program. Prerequisite: SPAN 11 with a grade of C or higher or proficiency as determined by the instructor. Offered each year.

SPAN 200 Spanish Study Abroad (1-6)

Students study Spanish and live with Mexican families in a beautiful historically rich city during a three-week stay in Puebla, Mexico. Students attend classes daily from 9:00 a.m. to noon and then return to their families for meals, excursions, and activities. Visits to all sites of cultural interest in and around Puebla, as well as weekend excursions to Veracruz, Oaxaca, and Tlaxcala are provided. This is an opportunity for total immersion in the Spanish language, culture, and life. Offered each summer.

SPAN 213 Intermediate Spanish (4)

Development of conversational and writing skills through review of familiar and complex structures, and extensive oral-aural practice. Students attain fluency at a secondary level and the ability to interpret written material adequate for the level. The course also looks at general aspects of the Spanish-speaking world relevant to the understanding of its culture. Prerequisite: SPAN 112 with a grade of C or higher. Co-requisite: consent determined by placement or other type of evaluation tool.

SPAN 265 U.S. Latino Culture (4)

Studies the Latino phenomenon in the U.S. as peculiar to a diaspora strongly united by language and adherence to a common cultural legacy. Students examine the circumstances causing the migration of specific groups entering the U.S. Emphasizes social issues such as labor, health, education, understanding of diversity within the Latino community, the acculturation process, and the overall impact of the Latino minority in U.S. society today. Prerequisite: consent. Offered fall of even-numbered years.

SPAN 270 Latin American Music and Dance (4) (A)

Covers the history of dance beginning in ancient Europe and the Middle East and ends with the history of dance in Latin America, particularly that of the development of dance in the Hispanic society. Also studies the importance of Latin music and dance in Latin America and the U.S. In the practical portion of this course, students have the opportunity to learn a variety of Latin dances such as salsa, merengue, and bachata, which have become very popular in contemporary American society. This course is taught in English and does not fulfill the Foreign Language requirement. Offered in selected Winter Sessions.

SPAN 300 Spanish Study Abroad (1-6)

Students study Spanish and live with Mexican families in a beautiful historically rich city during a three-week stay in Puebla, Mexico. Students attend classes daily from 9:00 a.m. to noon and then return to their families for meals, excursions, and activities. Visits to all sites of cultural interest in and around Puebla, as well as weekend excursions to Veracruz, Oaxaca, and Tlaxcala are provided. This is an opportunity for total immersion in the Spanish language, culture, and life. Offered each summer.

SPAN 300. Credit Adjustment for Repeat (3)

SPAN 307 Topics in Advanced Conversation and Composition (4) (W)

Emphasizes reading for comprehension and the articulation of ideas in Spanish. An introduction to Spanish Civilization and Culture through the analysis and discussion of carefully chosen publications written by Latin American and Peninsular writers. Can be taken more than once for credit.

SPAN 313 Seminar in Hispanic Cultures (4)

A travel course focusing on the contrasting diversity and unifying elements of the Spanish speaking world. Topic varies depending on the destination. Students visit museums, historical landmarks, and important cultural and natural sites in the chosen destination in order to examine the historical, ethnic, and geographic aspects that contribute to the distinctive nature of Hispanic societies. Can be repeated for credit as assignments and/or itinerary varies. Counts for the study abroad requirement in the Spanish major. Prerequisite: consent. Offered in selected winter and summers sessions.

SPAN 316 Studies in Hispanic Poetry (4)

Studies representative poets, periods, and poetic traditions and styles of Spain and Spanish America. Critical analyses of the texts in their original form is complemented with discussion of the author's work in translation. Prerequisite: SPAN 213. Offered in rotation.

SPAN 317 Civilization of Spain (4) (W)

Studies the history of Spain and its rich cultural legacy. Students become familiar with the most transcendental events in this nation's past. Focuses on distinct artists and their work, iconic figures, traditions, and popular trends that have had an impact in and outside Spain's national borders. Prerequisite: SPAN 213 recommended. Offered in rotation.

SPAN 318 Civilization of Latin America (4)

Students learn about Latin American countries, their people, and their civilizations through the study of major works of literature, art, and music. Ideas presented in class are reinforced through films, slide presentations, and guest speakers. Prerequisite: SPAN 306 or consent. Offered alternate years.

SPAN 321 Political Writings of Latin America (4)

Focuses on readings from the political writings of selected Latin American thinkers. Students analyzes writings that range in time from the Spanish Conquest to the present time providing a historical overview of the development of the political thought in Latin America. Identical to POLS 321. Offered each fall.

SPAN 329 Latin America through the Cinema (4) (A)

Analyzes a selection of Latin American feature films and documentaries in order to understand the political, social, and economic conditions that characterize this region. Students explore the constitution of national identities, questions of ideology, class, race, ethnicity and gender. They address the conditions of film production in light of globalization and Hollywood's competition and use of film as a tool for social change. Films are screened outside of class. Prerequisite: SPAN 307 recommended. Offered intermittently.

SPAN 333 Commercial Spanish (4)

Designed for students and professionals who wish to learn Spanish for use in a practical business context. Prerequisite: SPAN 212, 213, or consent.

SPAN 345 Seminar in Spanish Literature (4)

Focuses on specific topics of Spanish literature to offer students the opportunity of in-depth examination. Students are encouraged to explore the topics comparatively and through other forms of cultural and artistic productions such as theatre and film. Offered in rotation.

SPAN 355 Myths, Rituals, and Reality in the Hispanic Syncretic Imagination (4) (S)

Examines the Hispanic culture through ideological notions, myths, iconic figures, traditions, and religious manifestations such as rituals. Discussion centers on the key issues that have resulted from the meeting of the two worlds and adaptation of the American first nations to the transformative reality of colonialism. (Includes travel component when taught during summer or winter sessions.) Prerequisite: consent for travel. Offered on demand.

SPAN 365 U.S. Latino Culture (4) (S)

Studies the Latino phenomenon in the U.S. as peculiar to a diaspora strongly united by language and adherence to a common cultural legacy. Students examine the circumstances causing the migration of specific groups entering the U.S. Emphasizes social issues such as labor, health, education, understanding of diversity within the Latino community, the acculturation process, and the overall impact of the Latino minority in U.S. society today. Prerequisite: SPAN 213 or consent. Offered fall of even-numbered years.

SPAN 370 Latin American Music and Dance (4) (A)

Covers the history of dance beginning in ancient Europe and the Middle East and ends with the history of dance in Latin America, particularly that of the development of dance in the Hispanic society. Also studies the importance of Latin music and dance in Latin America and the U.S. In the practical portion of this course, students have the opportunity to learn a variety of Latin dances such as salsa, merengue, and bachata, which have become very popular in contemporary American society. This course is taught in English and does not fulfill the Foreign Language requirement. Offered in selected Winter Sessions.

SPAN 375 Topics in Mexican Culture and History (4)

A multidisciplinary approach to Mexico and its diaspora throughout history based on discussion of specific issues. Students examine specific topics that define Mexican culture using a selection of fictional and non-fictional literary pieces and other forms of cultural and artistic expression. May be repeated for credit as designated topics change. Offered each spring.

SPAN 471 Practicum in the Teaching of Spanish (4)

Students learn various methods for teaching of grammar, writing, and speaking Spanish. They also serve as assistants and tutors in SPAN 111, 112, and 213. Prerequisites: SPAN 307 (or the capability of using the Spanish language effectively) and consent. May be repeated for credit. Offered each year.

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