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Course Descriptions

Classics Courses

EES 130 Physical Geology without Laboratory (4)

Identical to EES 131 but with web-based assignments in lieu of a formal laboratory. Intended for those interested in learning about geology but who do not wish to take a lab, especially those pursuing teaching certification. Students intending to major in EES should take EES 131. Offered each fall.

EES 131 Physical Geology with Laboratory (4)

Investigates the materials and processes that characterize the interior of our dynamic and ever-changing planet. Topics include rocks and minerals, volcanism, earthquakes, the origin of mountains, the vastness of geologic time, and the unifying theory of plate tectonics. Intended for those seeking laboratory general studies credit and/or those interested in pursuing a major in EES. Offered each fall semester and occasional spring semesters.

EES 132 Environmental Geology Without Laboratory (4)

Identical to EES 133 but with web-based assignments in lieu of a formal laboratory. Intended for those interested in learning about environmental geology but who do not wish to take a lab, especially those pursuing teaching certification. Students intending to major in EES should take EES 133. Offered each spring.

EES 133 Environmental Geology with Laboratory (4)

Investigates the interaction between people and the earth. Acquaints students with issues surrounding the origin, distribution, and exploitation of water, mineral, and energy resources. Natural hazards and their mitigation and issues surrounding Earth's climate are investigated. Intended for those seeking laboratory general studies credit and/or those interested in pursuing a major in EES. Offered each spring.

EES 200 Oceanography (4)

Explores the geology of the ocean basins and the physical and chemical nature of seawater. Topics studied include ocean waves, tides, and currents. Links between the oceans and the atmosphere are explored with special emphasis on the effect of oceans on climate, El Nino, and climate change. Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours each week. Designed for science and non-science majors. Prerequisite or corequisite: math placement level H , A, or B, or MATH 104 or 105 Offered each fall.

EES 210 Meteorology (4)

An introduction to the atmosphere and the science behind weather phenomena such as clouds, hurricanes, and tornadoes. Students practice weather forecasting, use meteorological instrumentation, and analyze global meteorological datasets. Designed for science and non-science majors. Prerequisite or corequisite: placement level H, A, or B, MATH 104 or 105. Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours each week. Offered each spring.

EES 250 Field Experiences in Earth and Environmental Sciences (2-4)

Provides students with an intensive field experience in selected areas. Studies are conducted to examine various geological sites and/or particular habitats. May be repeated for credit as topics change. May be taken for 2 or 4 credits. Does not fulfill the Natural Sciences requirements for Latin Honors. Prerequiste: consent. Offered in selected Winter Sessions or summers on demand.

EES 270 Environmental Chemistry (4)

An exploration of the earth system and human perturbations to that system from a chemical perspective. Topics covered include ozone depletion, persistent organic pollutants, wastewater treatment, and toxicity of environmental contaminants. Laboratory exercises give students experience in environmental sampling and analysis. Identical to CHEM 270. Prerequisites: CHEM 117 and 118. Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours each week. Offered fall of odd-numbered years.

EES 300 Introduction to Geographic Information Systems (4)

Introduces the computer-literate student to the underlying theory and practical applications of Graphic Information System (GIS) technology. Lectures are interwoven with hands-on computer exercises that illustrate the principles, develop technical competence, and demonstrate the versatility of GIS. Individualized projects reinforce concepts and help students acquire the knowledge and confidence required to use GIS outside the classroom. Does not fulfill any requirements for Latin Honors. Prerequisites: math placement level H, A, or B, and junior/senior status, or MATH 104 or 105, or consent. Offered fall of even-numbered years.

EES 320 Energy and the Environment (4)

An introduction to the fundamental physical concepts underlying energy, its conversion, and its impact on the environment. Topics include fossil fuels, nuclear-fueled power plants, renewable forms of energy, pollution, and energy conversion. Prerequisite: math placement level H or A, or MATH 135. Offered fall of odd-numbered years.

EES 330 Geology of Mountain Belts (4)

An introduction to the disciplines of stratigraphy and structural geology, focusing on mountain belts as case studies. Topics include the observation, description and interpretation of the sedimentary record; the measurement and analysis of folds, faults and other features associated with tectonic uplift; and the tectonic history of the Appalachians. Prerequisites: EES 124/125 or EES 130/131 or consent. Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours each week. Includes at least two required field trips to key locations in the central Appalachians. Offered spring of even-numbered years.

EES 400 Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) (2)

Introduces the broad research applications of SEM. Topics include sample preparation, critical point drying, sputter coating, imaging, and x-ray microanalysis. Includes weekly hands-on training with the SEM and completion of an independent research project. Prerequisites: junior/senior status and consent. Identical to BIO 400. Offered in select spring semesters and Winter Session.

EES 410 Watershed Hydrology (4)

An introduction to the underlying theory and practical applications of water science at the watershed scale. Lectures include brief in-class exercises and problems that illustrate hydrologic principles. Prerequisites: EES 132 or ESS 133 and math placement H or A, or MATH 135. Offered spring of even-numbered years.

EES 435 Tropical Ecology (4) (I)

An intensive field experience in neotropical ecosystems (coral reefs, rainforests, caves, mangrove swamps, etc.), that links ecological phenomena with social and historical factors to examine the conservation of biodiversity. Field activities require moderately strenuous exercise and considerable hiking. Destinations may include Trinidad, Belize, Costa Rica, or other tropical sites. Course fee. Identical to BIO 435. Offered Winter Session of even-numbered years.

EES 450 Global Environmental Cycles (4)

Explores the connections among the atmosphere, hydrosphere, lithosphere, and biosphere through exploration of global cycling of nutrients and pollutants. Students investigate these biogeochemical cycles through analysis of primary research articles, field measurements, chemical analysis, and a self-designed research project. Prerequisites: junior/senior status and a major in the natural sciences. Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours each week. Identical to CHEM 450. Offered spring of odd-numbered years.

EES 470 Internship in the Natural Sciences (2-4)

An intensive study of a particular field of science through on-site field experience. Internships involve hands-on opportunities in the sciences that are relevant to chosen site. Students may enroll for 2 or 4 semester hours in a given semester. A minimum of 80 hours devoted to the internship is expected for 2 semester hours, and a minimum of 160 hours is expected for 4 semester hours, but some placements may require more time. Students must coordinate their internship placement with the supervising faculty member at least two months prior to placement. Pass/fail grading. Prerequisites: junior/senior status and consent. Offered each semester and most Winter Sessions (2 semester hours only).

EES 489 Research in the Natural Sciences (2-4)

Offers students the opportunity to conduct original scientific research in an area of interest. Students work closely with one or more members of the natural science faculty to develop and conduct a research project, then present their findings orally during the semester's undergraduate research symposium and as a formal research paper. Students are encouraged to present their findings at a conference. Prerequisites: junior/senior status and a major in the natural sciences, prior approval by the project advisor, and consent of the instructor. Students may enroll for 2 or 4 semester hours in a given semester. May be repeated for a maximum of 8 semester hours. Identical to BIO 489, CHEM 489, and CS 489. Offered each semester and most Winter Sessions (2 semester hours only).

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