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Course Descriptions

Chemistry Courses

CHEM 120 Introductory Chemistry (4)

An introduction to chemical principles, including atomic and molecular structure, states of matter, chemical reactions, stoichiometry, thermodynamics, and chemical equilibria. Most of the work is quantitative in nature. Emphasizes development of problem solving skills. Lecture four hours, laboratory three hours each week. Prerequisites: high school chemistry, CHEM 105 or equivalent or PHSC 100 or equivalent and math placement H, A or B, or MATH 104 or 105 with a grade of C or higher. Offered each fall.

CHEM 200 Inorganic Chemistry (4)

An integrated lecture and laboratory experience introducting the concepts of inorganic chemistry in light of modern theory. Topics include chemical periodicity, bonding, kinetics, descriptive chemistry, coordination chemistry, oxidation-reduction, electrochemistry, and solid-state structure, as well as techniques for synthesis and characterization of inorganic compounds. Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours each week. Prerequisite: CHEM 117 with consent or CHEM 120. Offered each spring.

CHEM 210 Analytical Chemistry (4)

Applies analytical techniques to inorganic, organic, and biochemical systems. The experimental methods include volumetric and gravimetric analysis, chromatographic, and spectroscopic techniques. Prerequisite: CHEM 118 or 120. Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours each week. Offered fall of even-numbered years.

CHEM 221 Organic Chemistry I (4)

A comprehensive survey of the chemistry of carbon compounds, including their structure, properties, reactions, reaction mechanisms, spectroscopy, and stereochemistry, with a focus on hydrocarbons, haloalkanes, and alcohols. Introduces to modern organic laboratory techniques, including purification methods, organic synthesis, and product analysis. Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours each week. Prerequisite: CHEM 118 or 120. Offered each fall.

CHEM 222 Organic Chemistry II (4)

A comprehensive survey of the chemistry of carbon compounds, including their structure, properties, reactions, reaction mechanisms, spectroscopy, and stereochemistry, with a focus on aromatic, amine, and carbonyl compounds. Development of organic laboratory skills including microscale techniques, organic synthesis, product analysis, and spectroscopy. Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours each week. Prerequisite: CHEM 221 or 311. Offered each spring.

CHEM 270 Environmental Chemistry (4)

An understanding of the chemistry of the natural world is vital to an understanding of earth processes, the fate of pollutants, and the proposal of solutions to environmental problems. Students explore the earth system and human perturbations to that system from a chemical perspective. Topics covered include ozone depletion, persistent organic pollutants, wastewater treatment, and toxicity of environmental contaminants. Laboratory exercises give students experience in environmental sampling and analysis. Identical to EES 270. Prerequisites: CHEM 117 and 118. Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours each week. Offered fall of odd-numbered years.

CHEM 290 Guided Study/Independent Res (1-6)

CHEM 305 Teaching Experience (1)

Qualified students assist chemistry faculty in teaching chemistry courses and laboratories. May be repeated for credit, but students may apply no more than 4 semester hours toward graduation. Prerequisite: consent. Offered each semester.

CHEM 311 Organic Chemistry I (3)

The chemistry of carbon compounds with emphasis on structure, properties, reactions, reaction mechanisms and stereochemistry. A comprehensive survey of organic compounds with a focus on hydrocarbons, alkyl halides and alcohols. Prerequisite: CHEM 118. Corequisite: CHEM 321. Lecture three hours each week. Offered each fall.

CHEM 312 Organic Chemistry II (3)

A continuation of CHEM 311 with a focus on the aromatic, amine, and carbonyl functional groups. Prerequisite: CHEM 311. Corequisite: CHEM 322. Lecture three hours each week. Offered each spring.

CHEM 330 Biochemistry (4) (W)

A survey of the chemistry within biological systems, including the structure and function of biomolecules, molecular components of cells, enzymes, and cellular metabolism. Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours each week. Prerequisites: successful completion of ENG 105 with a grade of C or higher and CHEM 222 or 312. Offered fall of even-numbered years.

CHEM 345 Forensic Science Methods (4)

A comprehensive evaluation of current developments in research, instrumentation, and laboratory technology used to detect, identify, analyze, and compare evidence generated by criminal activity. Prerequisite: CHEM 118 or 120. Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours each week. Offered spring of even-numbered years.

CHEM 347 Physical Chemistry I (4)

A comprehensive survey of the physical-chemical behavior of matter, including thermodynamics, equilibrium, and electrochemistry. Introduces modern laboratory techniques, including instrumental-based studies of equilibrium, electrochemical properties, and mixture analyses. Prerequisites: CHEM 210, MATH 172, and PHYS 222. Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours each week. Offered fall of odd-numbered years.

CHEM 348 Physical Chemistry II (4)

A mathematical treatment of physical-chemical properties and chemical reactions, with emphasis on quantum mechanics, spectroscopy, and kinetics. Prerequisite: CHEM 347 Offered spring of even-numbered years.

CHEM 438 Advanced Biochemistry (4)

A comprehensive study of complex biochemical processes, with an emphasis on cellular metabolism and its regulation, cellular signaling, and cellular information transfer. Prerequisite: CHEM 330. Offered spring of odd-numbered years.

CHEM 450 Global Environmental Cycles (4)

Explores the connections among the atmosphere, hydrosphere, lithosphere, and biosphere through exploration of global cycling of nutrients and pollutants. Students investigate these biogeochemical cycles through analysis of primary research articles, field measurements, chemical analysis, and a self-designed research project. Prerequisites: junior/senior status and a major in the natural sciences. Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours each week. Identical to EES 450. Offered spring of odd-numbered years.

CHEM 455 Advanced Chemistry Topics (4)

A focused, in-depth study of a selected topic in chemistry. Taught as a seminar with an emphasis on interpreting data and critical analysis of primary literature, and may involve laboratory work. May be repeated for credit as topics change. Prerequisite: consent. Offered fall of even-numbered years.

CHEM 470 Internship in the Natural Sciences (2-4)

An intensive study of a specific field of science through an on-site field experience, with hands-on learning opportunities that are relevant to the chosen site. Students may enroll for 2 or 4 hours in a given semester. A minimum of 80 hours devoted to the internship is expected for 2 semester hours, and a minimum of 160 hours is expected for 4 semester hours, but some placements may require more time. Students must coordinate their internship placement with the supervising faculty member at least two months prior to placement. Pass/fail grading. Prerequisites: junior/senior status and consent. Offered each semester and most Winter Sessions (2 semester hours only).

CHEM 480 Instrumental Methods of Analysis (4)

A study of the instrumental methods used in characterizing chemical systems. Topics include optical methods, electroanalytical methods, atomic and molecular spectroscopy, and chromatography methods. Examines analytical techniques from an instrumental and chemical point of view. Prerequisite: CHEM 210 and 8 additional semester hours in chemistry. Three lecture hours, three laboratory hours each week. Offered each spring.

CHEM 489 Research in the Natural Sciences (2-4)

Offers students the opportunity to conduct original scientific research in an area of interest. Students work closely with one or more members of the natural science faculty to develop and conduct a research project, then present their findings orally during the semester's undergraduate research symposium and as a formal research paper. Students are encouraged to present their findings at a conference. Prerequisites: junior/senior status and a major in the natural sciences, prior approval by the project advisor, and consent of the instructor. Students may enroll for 2 or 4 semester hours in a given semester. May be repeated for a maximum of 8 semester hours. Identical to BIO 489, CS 489, and EES 489. Offered each semester and most Winter Sessions (2 semester hours only).

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