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Course Descriptions

BIO 100 The World of Biology (4)

An introduction to biology. Provides an overview of the study of life, including how biology affects our daily lives, including such topics as biodiversity, genetic engineering, and problems associated with the expanding human population. Designed for non-science majors. $50 lab fee. Offered each semester.

BIO 131 Principles of Biology I: Evolution and Ecology (4)

An introduction to the biological sciences. Lecture topics include Darwinian evolution, the origin and diversity of life, functional morphology, and ecology. Designed specifically for students intending to pursue a major in biology or EES. $50 lab fee. Offered each fall.

BIO 132 Principles of Biology II: Cell Biology and Genetics (4)

Completes the introduction to the biological sciences for biology and EES majors. Lecture topics include biochemistry, cell structure and processes, cell respiration, fermentation, photosynthesis, cell division, Mendelian genetics, gene expression, cancer biology, and animal physiology. $50 lab fee. Offered each spring.

BIO 150 Introduction to Marine Biology (4)

An introduction to the organisms and communities of marine and estuarine areas. Students examine the basic physical and ecological processes that are pertinent to marine habitats and the diversity of marine organisms and ecosystems. Includes field and laboratory identification of local organisms and investigations of local field habitats. Designed for non-science majors. $50 lab fee. Offered each fall.

BIO 221 Human Anatomy and Physiology I (4)

An integrated lecture/laboratory experience that examines the anatomy and physiology of humans. Includes a survey of the nervous, muscular, skeletal, integumentary, and respiratory systems. Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours each week. $50 lab fee. Offered each fall.

BIO 222 Human Anatomy and Physiology II (4)

An integrated lecture/laboratory experience that examines the anatomy and physiology of humans. Includes a survey of the cardiovascular, endocrine, digestive, urinary and reporductive systems. Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours each week. $50 lab fee. Offered spring on demand.

BIO 300 Plant and Fungal Evolution (4)

An investigation into the evolution of fungi and plants, including related algae, from cellular to organismal perspectives. The laboratory involves morphological observation of vegetative and reproductive structures critical to the understanding of how these organisms complete their life histories and interact with the environment. Prerequisite: BIO 131 (C or higher). Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours each week. Offered spring of odd-numbered years.

BIO 300 Study Abroad (1-6)

BIO 308 Molecular Plant Physiology (4) (W)

A study of the molecular nature of how plants survive and respond to their environment. Topics include hormone regulation, carbon metaboilsm, plant cell identity, fluid transport and response to stress. Common techniques used in molecular biology will be introduced. Groups will design a short research project utilizing these techniques. Prerequsites: BIO 131, BIO 132 and ENG 105 with a grade of C or higher. Corequisite: BIO 311. Offered on demand.

BIO 311 Genetics (4)

Principles of heredity as applied to both plants and animals. Prerequisites: CHEM*120 and BIO*131 and 132. Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours each week. Offered each semester.

BIO 316 General Ecology (4) (W)

A study of the interrelationships between organisms and their environment. Topics will range from the individual level to the global scale, including both basic and applied ecological topics. Same as EES*316. Prerequisites: eng 105 with a grade of C or higher, BIO*131 and sophomore status or higher. Offered each fall.

BIO 320 Ornithology (4)

A study of birds, emphasizing diversity, behavioral ecology, and life history. Regular field observations are required and may occur under a variety of weather conditions. Prerequisite: BIO 131. Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours each week. Offered on demand.

BIO 354 Marine Invertebrate Evolution (4)

An introduction to the study of evolutionary processes, with particular attention paid to marine invertebrates, especially marine bivalves, because their rich evolutionary history and well-documented fossil record. Evolution is examined at a variety of scales from molecular to ecological. Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours each week. Prerequisite: BIO 131 or BIO 132. $50 lab fee. Offered fall of even-numbered years on demand.

BIO 355 Marine Biology (4)

A study of organismal adaptation and community organization in marine and estuarine habitats. A variety of marine habitats are examined, with the laboratory focusing primarily on local species and habitat types. Prerequisite: BIO 131. Offered each fall.

BIO 371 Histology (4)

A detailed study of the cells, tissues, and organs that comprise the mammalian body. Intended for students seeking careers in biology, medicine, or veterinary sciences. Prerequisite: a grade of C or higher in BIO 131 and 132. Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours each week. Offered on demand.

BIO 372 Comparative Anatomy (4)

A study of the evolution, morphology, and physiology of vertebrates. An intensive laboratory-directed examination of the major organ systems of vertebrates as exemplified by the lamprey, dogfish, salamander, and cat. Intended for students seeking careers in biology, medicine, or veterinary sciences. Prerequisite: BIO 131 and BIO 132 with a grade of C or higher or consent. Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours each week. Offered on demand.

BIO 373 Invertebrate Zoology (4)

A survey of the invertebrate phyla, emphasizing the classification, evolution, ecology, morphology, and life histories of these organisms. Includes laboratory examinations of representative groups and field sampling of local invertebrate fauna. Prerequisite: BIO 131. Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours each week. Offered on demand.

BIO 375 Topics in Tropical Biology (4)

An intensive field experience in neotropical ecosystems (rainforests, coral reefs, mangroves, caves, etc.). Descriptive studies of local flora and fauna will be combined with an in-depth investigation of a topic of interest. Field activities will include moderately strenouos exercise under a variety of weather conditions. Destinations may include Belize, Costa Rica, Trinidad, or other tropical sites. Course fee required. Prerequisite: BIO 131 or consent. May be repeated for credit as topics change. Offered in selected winter sessions. Identical to EES 375.

BIO 377 Entomology & Arachnology (4)

A comprehensive survey of the insects and arachnids of medical, economic, and ecological significance. Includes laboratory examinations of living and preserved specimens and field collections of select taxa. Prerequisite: BIO 131. Offered on demand.

BIO 380 Comparative Animal Physiology (4)

A study of the basic mechanisms by which animals function. Emphasizes how both invertebrate and vertebrate organisms change these basic mechanisms to adapt to environmental conditions. Prerequisites: a grade of C or higher in BIO 131 or consent. Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours each week. Offered on demand.

BIO 384 Developmental Biology (4)

Explores the processes by which organisms grow and develop. Emphasizes principles and concepts that govern development in model organisms such as sea urchins, flatworms, fruit flies, zebra fish, and chickens. Regeneration of appendages, stem cells, cancer, and plants are discussed. Prerequisite: BIO 311 or consent. Offered on demand.

BIO 385 Animal Behavior (4)

A study of the mechanisms and evolution of animal behavior. Topics include genetics and development of behavior, neural and physiological mechanisms of behavior, communication, social behavior, habitat selection, reproductive behavior, and parental investment. Laboratory exercises provide hands-on experiences for many of these concepts. Prerequisites: BIO 131 and 132 or consent. Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours each week. Offered spring of odd-numbered years.

BIO 400 Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) (2-4)

Introduces the broad research applications of SEM. Topics include sample preparation, critical point drying, sputter coating, imaging, and x-ray microanalysis. Includes weekly hands-on training with the SEM and completion of an independent research project. May be taken for 2 or 4 credits. Prerequisites: junior/senior status and consent. Identical to EES 400. Offered in select terms.

BIO 410 Evolution (4)

A study of the theory of bilogical evaolution through natural selection. Topics include microevaolution, speciation, macroevolution, evoluntionary ecology and modern methods of determining phylogenetic relationships. Prerequisite: BIO 131, junior/senior status. Offered on demand.

BIO 412 Chemical Ecology (4)

A study of how organisms use chemicals to mediate interactions within and between species. Students will gain experience interpreting primary research articles as varying topics are discussed, such as plant-herbivore interactions, coral chemical defenses, and insect semiochemicals. Prerequisite: BIO 131, BIO 132, any 200-level chemistry course and junior/senior status, or consent. Lecture three hours each week. Offered each fall.

BIO 420 Cell and Molecular Biology (4)

A study of the structure and function of prokaryotes and eukaryotes at the cellular and molecular level. Emphasizes the molecular nature of cellular structure, metabolism, and physiology. Prerequisite: BIO 311. Offered spring of even-numbered years.

BIO 435 Tropical Ecology (4) (I)

An intensive field experience in neotropical ecosystems (coral reefs, rainforests, caves, mangrove swamps, etc.) that links ecological phenomena with social and historical factors to examine the conservation of biodiversity. Field activities require moderately strenuous exercise and considerable hiking. Destinations may include Trinidad, Belize, Costa Rica, or other tropical sites. Course fee. Identical to EES 435. Offered Winter Session of even-numbered years.

BIO 460 Zymurgy: The Science of Fermentation (4) (I)

Introduces the science and art of fermentation and considers the use of alcohol by human societies. Prerequisite: senior status or consent. Offered in selected Winter Sessions and spring semesters.

BIO 470 Internship in the Natural Sciences (2-4)

An intensive study of a specific field of science through an on-site field experience with hands-on learning opportunities that are relevant to the chosen site. Students may enroll for 2 or 4 hours in a given semester. A minimum of 80 hours devoted to the internship is expected for 2 semester hours and a minimum of 160 hours is expected for 4 semester hours, but some placements may require more time. Students must coordinate their internship placement with the supervising faculty member at least two months prior to placement. Pass/fail grading. Prerequisites: junior/senior status and consent. Offered each semester and most Winter Sessions (2 semester only).

BIO 475 Natural and Social History of the Chesapeake Bay (4) (I)

Provides a comprehensive view of one of the largest and most diverse estuaries in the world. Students examine the relationships between the natural history and the human history, including social and political aspects, use of the bay by various societies and their impact on and preservation of the bay. Saturday field trips required. Prerequisite: junior/senior status. Offered on demand.

BIO 482 Microbiology (4)

Teaches basic microbiological concepts and the role of microorganisms in various applied areas. Topics include microbial physiology, cell structure, microbial genetics, pathogenic microorganisms and disease, and environmental and applied microbiology. Students practice aseptic technique, isolation and identification of bacteria, staining, and determination of microbial numbers. Prerequisite: BIO 311. Offered each fall.

BIO 489 Research in the Natural Sciences (2-4)

Offers students the opportunity to conduct original scientific research in an area of interest. Students work closely with one or more members of the natural science faculty to develop and conduct a research project, then present their findings orally during the semester's undergraduate research symposium and as a formal research paper. Students are encouraged to present their findings at a conference. Prerequisites: junior/senior status and a major in the natural sciences, prior approval by the project advisor, and consent of the instructor. Students may enroll for 2 or 4 semester hours in a given semester. May be repeated for a maximum of 8 semester hours. Identical to CHEM 489, CS 489, and EES 489. Offered each semester and most Winter Sessions (2 semester hours only).

BIO EL2 Elective (3)

BIO EL3 Elective (3)

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